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Showing posts with label Book Review. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Book Review. Show all posts

Sunday, March 4, 2018

Book Review Black Widow Vol. 1: S.H.I.E.L.D.'s Most Wanted

Book Review - Black Widow Vol. 1: S.H.I.E.L.D.'s Most Wanted                   Rating: ★ ★ ★ ★

Black Widow Vol. 1: S.H.I.E.L.D.'s Most Wanted
Black Widow

Black Widow Vol. 1: S.H.I.E.L.D.'s Most Wanted

They wowed you with Daredevil, now the Eisner Award-winning team of Mark Waid and Chris Samnee take Black Widow to new heights -by forcing her to go on the lam! Natasha has a lifetime of secrets, and when some of the darkest ones are made public, nobody is safe. As S.H.I.E.L.D. turns on its once greatest asset, she seeks out her own answers in a knockdown drag-out tale of action and espionage! 
But will the Widow's hunt for the Weeping Lion send her back to the one place she never wanted to go? And, when a S.H.I.E.L.D. funeral makes the assembled top brass an attractive target, it's lucky for them that the Black Widow is still on their side, even if they aren't on hers.

About the author:

Mark Waid, a New York Times bestselling author, has written for a wider variety of well-known pop-culture characters and franchises than any other American author, from Superman to Star Wars to the Justice League to Archie to Spider-Man and many, many others. His award-winning work with artist Alex Ross, KINGDOM COME, is one of the best-selling graphic novels of all time. (Secretly, however, he prefers SUPERMAN: BIRTHRIGHT and his IRREDEEMABLE collections as his favorite works he's produced.)

Additionally, Waid is a leader in the digital comics medium. His publishing imprint, Thrillbent.com, hosts an enormous collection of multimedia stories in all genres.

With over thirty years of experience in his field, Waid happily mentors young writers and maintains a blog at www.markwaid.com that is full of advice for beginning writers and experienced authors both. 

I love this series and everything it is doing with Black Widow's past trying to haunt her. If marvel gets around to making a Black Widow movie (which they should) they should just adapt this book it would fit perfectly in the MCU with very little change necessary.

Waid and Samnee lay down a marker basically storyboarding an awesome black widow movie. The dialoguless first issue is a tour de force of action art that really shows off just how good Samnee is at telling a story in exciting and unpredictable ways. If your interest is even slightly piqued do yourself a favor and just pick this up you will be very happy you did! Now let's hope Marvel can keep them on this book for a long time!
Mark Waid and Chris Samnee continue to redefine Marvel's classic characters. These first six issues easily stand on their own as powerful and iconic storytelling; it's just as gripping as the acclaimed Warren Ellis and Declan Shalvey Moon Knight run from 2014. Waid proves that he can carry on the brutal and badass characterization from Nathan Edmondson's previous run, and nobody conveys clear action and movement like Chris Samnee. Matt Wilson also graces the book with his beautiful palettes, and it looks like this Daredevil team isn't going to stop delivering amazing comics anytime soon.

Great action sequences and a plot with plenty of twists and turns. If you haven't read this already, I'll wait here while you go. Buy. Read. This is good stuff

This a great read I would recommend to anyone interested in the character.
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Book Review Black Widow Vol. 1: S.H.I.E.L.D.'s Most Wanted

Book Review Wonder Woman Unbound: The Curious History of the World's Most Famous Superheroine

Book Review - Wonder Woman Unbound: 

The Curious History of the World's Most Famous Superheroine

Rating: ★ ★ ★ ★

The Curious History of the World's Most Famous Heroine
Wonder Woman Unbound

Wonder Woman Unbound: 
The Curious History of the World's Most Famous Super Heroine
This close look at Wonder Woman’s history portrays a complicated heroine who is more than just a female Superman with a golden lasso and bullet-deflecting bracelets. 
The original Wonder Woman was ahead of her time, advocating female superiority and the benefits of matriarchy in the 1940s. At the same time, her creator filled the comics with titillating bondage imagery, and Wonder Woman was tied up as often as she saved the world. In the 1950s, Wonder Woman begrudgingly continued her superheroic mission, wishing she could settle down with her boyfriend instead, all while continually hinting at hidden lesbian leanings. 
While other female characters stepped forward as women’s lib took off in the late 1960s, Wonder Woman fell backwards, losing her superpowers and flitting from man to man. Ms. magazine and Lynda Carter restored Wonder Woman’s feminist strength in the 1970s, turning her into a powerful symbol as her checkered past was quickly forgotten. 
Exploring this lost history adds new dimensions to the world’s most beloved female character, and Wonder Woman Unbound delves into her comic book and its spin-offs as well as the myriad motivations of her creators to showcase the peculiar journey that led to Wonder Woman’s iconic status.

About the author:
Tim Hanley is a comic book historian, and the author of WONDER WOMAN UNBOUND: THE CURIOUS HISTORY OF THE WORLD'S MOST FAMOUS HEROINE, INVESTIGATING LOIS LANE: THE TURBULENT HISTORY OF THE DAILY PLANET'S ACE REPORTER, and THE MANY LIVES OF CATWOMAN: THE FELONIOUS HISTORY OF A FELINE FATALE.

His website, Straitened Circumstances, discusses Wonder Woman, Lois Lane, and women in comics, and his column "Gendercrunching" runs monthly on Bleeding Cool. He has contributed to several pop culture sites, including the Los Angeles Review of Books and The Comics Journal. He lives in Halifax, Nova Scotia, between his massive stacks of comic books.

This book is great because it discusses the complete history of Wonder Woman from her beginnings to the present day (circa 2014, that is). Even being a diehard Wonder Woman fan there were parts of her history that I didn't even know. I didn't know that there was a point in time in which Wonder Woman lost her powers. I would love to find some of those old comic books to read them. This is a great book for any diehard Wonder Woman fan as well as anyone new to Wonder Woman. This book contains a lot of information and is an excellent resource!

Wonder Woman Unbound: The Curious History of the World’s Most Famous Heroine is an entertaining and thoughtful history of the creation and evolution of the most iconic female character is comics. The author begins where all good comic book stories begin: the origin story. In 1941, psychologist and inventor William Moulton Marston (the creator of the systolic blood pressure test, the precursor of the polygraph test) set out to create a comic book heroine that not only would appeal to women, but also prepare young men for a feminist future. Marston’s philosophy was strongly rooted in the belief of female superiority, and he believed that one day women would take their place as the leaders of the world. Wonder Woman, then, was originally meant as a guide to teach boys to submit to female authority.

The author has clearly made a valuable contribution to comic book historical research, yet I found that Wonder Woman Unbound is best enjoyed if it’s not treated like a scholarly tome. If Wonder Woman Unbound ends up on the required reading list for a college course on gender studies, popular culture, or freshman composition, I wouldn’t be surprised. It’s the kind of book that can get conversations going, and no professor is going to miss this opportunity to push sex into the forefront of the discussion. 
This book is such an interesting exposé on such a famous hero. And not just discussing her attributions but also other women in comics and even critiquing the males that society reveres. This books borders a master's thesis and I recommend this to anyone who is fascinated by comic books, the industry, Wonder Woman and most importantly, feminists.
Great book, highly recommended!
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Book Review - Wonder Woman Unbound

The Curious History of the World's Most Famous Superheroines

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Wonder Woman Unbound: The Curious History of the World's Most Famous Superheroine

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Review Book The Death House

Review Book - The Death House

The Death House - Amazon.com
Death House

Toby’s life was perfectly normal… until it was unravelled by something as simple as a blood test. 

Taken from his family, Toby now lives in the Death House; an out-of-time existence far from the modern world, where he, and the others who live there, are studied by Matron and her team of nurses. They’re looking for any sign of sickness. Any sign of their wards changing. Any sign that it’s time to take them to the sanatorium.

No one returns from the sanatorium.

Living in his memories of the past, Toby spends his days fighting his fear. But then a new arrival in the house shatters the fragile peace, and everything changes.

Because everybody dies. It’s how you choose to live that counts. 
About the Author :

Sarah Pinborough is a critically acclaimed horror, thriller and YA author. She has written for New Tricks on the BBC and has an original horror film in development. Sarah was the 2014 winner of the British Fantasy Award for Best Novella, and has three times been short-listed for Best Novel. She has also been short-listed for a World Fantasy Award. She lives in London.
 

Sarah Pinborough​'s The Death House is a stunning, powerful, painful, and yes, beautiful, read. The speculative elements are slight, but all the more intriguing for it. The focus is squarely on the main character, Toby, and the sudden turn of events that lands him in the Death House alongside other children who've suffered the same fate. Its brilliance is in the characters and the whiplash of emotions they (and you) go through during this short, engrossing read. Fans of Neil Gaiman, Lord of the Flies, and light psychological horror should give this a go.
There’s a whole generation of kids right now growing up on a steady diet of YA dystopia, and when they are ready to move on to more solid grown-up fare, here is the book to get them there.

Here is a dystopia we-the-reader don’t even see, don’t have explained to us beyond the barest of bare-bones basics. There’s no scrappy rebellion against the system, no Team This Guy and Team That Guy ‘ship wars.

In this world, kids are routinely blood-tested for some never-named disease / genetic anomaly. The ones whose results come back as ‘Defective’ are, with no warning, picked up by agents in vans and whisked away to a boarding school on an island. There, they just … wait. Every now and then, kids get sick and are taken upstairs to the sanatorium, never to be seen again.

So many questions! The symptoms of the disease seem to vary, the kids share rumors about its effects and history, but none of them know, so neither do we. The nurses and teachers, overseen by Matron, are cool and detached. Lessons are perfunctory. Socialization is pretty much left to fend for itself.
This was a fascinating book, and one I highly recommend. A gothic romance of sorts told as a fable. Powerfully emotional, often shocking and complex enough to keep you on your toes, not so much with the plot twists, which are fairly telegraphed, frankly, but with the way the characters act and react to shocking, horrific, unreal situations.

Not without its flaws, for sure, but the pluses definitely outweigh any nagging negatives. This one will stay with you for a long time and haunt you - the overall affect, like the northern lights described within, is brilliant. A must-read.
http://amzn.to/2BAInRG
The Death House
http://amzn.to/2BwHn17

Book Review The Cured

Book Review - The Cured

The Cured - Amazon.com
The Cured

Henry spent eight years chained to a post. Exposed, starved, infected with the December Plague, and mad. During those eight years, the December Plague consumed most of the world's human population, causing the infected to become violent and cannibalistic.

But Henry escaped. And now he's been Cured. He vividly remembers what has been done to him and others. He can also recall the terrible things he did while he was infected. He and his fellow survivors face a world unlike anything they knew before. They are weak, lost and completely alone. Now released from both the madness of the Plague and the cruelty of their captors, they must decide which is more important: survival or revenge.

The After the Cure Series:
Book 1: After the Cure
Book 2: The Cured
Book 3: Krisis
Book 4: Poveglia
Book 5: The 40th Day
About the Author :
Deirdre Gould lives in Central Maine with her three children and husband. She's also resided in northern Idaho, coastal Virginia and central Pennsylvania, but all of them just led her back home.The winters sure are cold, but that just means the zombies run slower. The area is isolated, but that just means the apocalyptic diseases don't spread as quickly. And the storms are bad enough that no one thinks you're crazy for "prepping." It's kind of ideal for a post-apocalypse writer when you think about it.

Want to keep up with the After the Cure series? Join the mailing list here: http://www.scullerytales.com/?page_id=96 to get the latest announcements about the series, special offers and free stories.

When I read the preview for this book I was disappointed to learn it would not revolve around the characters from the first book. But the premise seemed interesting and the writing was good so I gave it a shot. It was incredible! The characters are just as engrossing and it became evident that while it was a different perspective, it was still very much a sequel to the first book, continuing the original story line.
This is not your normal zombie story, it's not told thru a zombie's eyes, but it's just as full of suspense, action, and excitement. I kept finding it hard to put down even for a few minutes and I knew I just had to keep reading. I loved the characters and I felt the pain and anguish that Henry went thru. This is one that will stay with me awhile.
Just remember to read After the Cure before starting on this book. It'll make more sense. Again, really in love with this series. Bringing a human quality to the zombie genre is so unique. Actually thinking of these horrifying creatures as suffering souls is genius. A few grammatical errors along the way, but it didn't distract too much. The characters are fully fleshed out and you are aching to know all of their backstories as your introduced to them. Warning though, major cliffhanger at the end!
 I would highly recommend.
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The Cured

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Book Review Annihilation: A Novel (The Southern Reach Trilogy Book 1)

Book Review - Annihilation

A Novel (The Southern Reach Trilogy Book 1)

Annihilation - Wikipedia
Annihilation

Area X has been cut off from the rest of the continent for decades. Nature has reclaimed the last vestiges of human civilization. The first expedition returned with reports of a pristine, Edenic landscape; the second expedition ended in mass suicide; the third expedition in a hail of gunfire as its members turned on one another. The members of the eleventh expedition returned as shadows of their former selves, and within weeks, all had died of cancer. In Annihilation, the first volume of Jeff VanderMeer's Southern Reach trilogy, we join the twelfth expedition.

The group is made up of four women: an anthropologist; a surveyor; a psychologist, the de facto leader; and our narrator, a biologist. Their mission is to map the terrain, record all observations of their surroundings and of one another, and, above all, avoid being contaminated by Area X itself.
They arrive expecting the unexpected, and Area X delivers—they discover a massive topographic anomaly and life forms that surpass understanding—but it's the surprises that came across the border with them and the secrets the expedition members are keeping from one another that change everything.
About the author :
Called “The Weird Thoreau” by The New Yorker, NYT bestseller Jeff VanderMeer has been a published writer since age 14. His most recent fiction is the critically acclaimed novel BORNE, which has received raves from the NYTBR, Los Angeles Times, Washington Post, and many more. Paramount Pictures has optioned BORNE for film.

VanderMeer's Southern Reach Trilogy was one of the publishing events of 2014, the trilogy made more than thirty year’s best lists, including Entertainment Weekly’s top 10. Paramount Pictures has made a movie out of the first volume of the Southern Reach, Annihilation, slated for release in 2018 and starring Tessa Thompson, Oscar Isaac, Gina Rodriguez, Natalie Portman, and Jennifer Jason Leigh.

His nonfiction appears in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, The Guardian, and The Atlantic.com. VanderMeer also wrote the world’s first fully illustrated creative-writing guide, Wonderbook. With his wife, Ann VanderMeer, he has edited may iconic anthologies. He lives in Tallahassee, Florida, with two wonderful cats. His hobbies include hiking, reading, and bird watching.


I am being a fan of these types of books, I felt VanderMeer had created the bones of great story, thought the fleshing out of that story was highly problematic and ultimately took what could have been a fabulous book down to merely a good story. It could have been so much more, and that, my fellow readers, is what is so deeply disappointing here. I wanted this to be a five star review, not merely three or four stars.

The bones of the story are truly intriguing - a mysterious Area X along the "lost coast" (the location is never truly identified for us by VanderMeer because God forbid we name anything here because names carry something mysterious about them. Unfortunately, we are never really told what. Names and locations are meaningless? Too confining? To defining? Your guess is as good as mine) where something dramatic and alien and unexplainable has occurred. Little goes in or comes out of Area X - and what does come back out is never who or what we think it is.

As I said, VanderMeer is a good enough writer that he hooks the reader early on and doesn't let go. I read all three books in the series, one right after the other, even though, in my opinion, the series remains vastly overpriced. Yet he is a very good writer and I did not want to wait to get through the series until the prices came down for each book. The first book is definitely the strongest of the three, but my feeling is that if you are going to invest time and money in the first book, there isn't much point unless you are prepared to see it through to the end of the series.

Many reviewers have compared the books to the TV series "Lost." I think the comparison is apt in that the island in "Lost" is mysterious and replete with strange and unexplained phenomenon. But I think the analogy is even more apt than that. Many viewers of "Lost" loved the ending, which I found sappy and saccharine, without any real answers to the questions I asked through-out the whole series. But many viewers became ,more attached to the characters than the storyline, so maybe they didn't care so much that no answers were really provided at the end. I did, however. I wanted real, concrete information to a show I had invested viewing over the course of many years. When I didn't get answers, I felt betrayed and let down.

I think many of the negative reviews of this series reflect this same kind of sensibility. VanderMeer has engaged in the cardinal sin of many writers - getting us hooked on a story, then disappointing many readers by failing to provide a concrete, satisfying conclusion with answers to our most important questions. Yes, you can leave some mystery, but too much unanswered is never a good thing.

I suspect that the author was striving to continue the mystery and lack of conclusive answers that the characters felt when confronting themselves, their motivations, each other, life, the unknown, etc. That the characters didn't fully understand themselves (ie, the mystery of their personhood) or the mystery of Area X, so why should we? I speculate here, but the author probably felt he was simply mimicking Area X in all of its grand mystery (and yes, mimicry plays a large role in the story and no, we are never really told why) and that his mimicry was important to the story.

But the problem is that such an approach is never truly satisfying to a large percentage of readers. What I was hoping for (but never got) was not so much an ending like the conclusion of "Lost" where there are no real answers but we feel so in love with the characters and their relationships with each other that we are not supposed to care our questions go unanswered, but more like the ending to the series "Battlestar Galactica" in which are questions are answered, but the answers are nothing that we really expected. I wanted a refreshing and unexpected surprise at the end. Something I didn't see coming.

You won't get that here. That is not to say that VanderMeer answers no questions about Area X - he does do that by the final book. That said, he just doesn't go far enough with many of those answers, nor are those answers in any way truly a wonderful and unexpected surprise.

Moreover, I failed to feel strongly attached to many of the characters, who seemed "lost" (no pun intended) within themselves. Control plays a strong role in book two, but fades almost entirely away in importance in book three. A lot of times you feel like shaking the characters and screaming "wake up," but they never do, but rather remain mired in their own confused and obscure states of being. Now I get the sense that VanderMeer wants use to revel in this as being a reflection of the utlimate meaning of the human condition, but frankly, it just feels unsatisfying and makes one feel frustrated with the characters. Many times they just meander through the story and their non-stop stream of consciousness fretting and lack of clarity does drag the story down at times.

Ending the story by stressing simply - aren't these characters fascinating in and of themselves and this is just the human condition, to remain an ultimate mystery to us - was deeply unsatisfying to me. Tell me what happens to Control. Tell me what happens to the Earth. Tell me the "why" of Area X. Tell me the "Why" of what happens to the biologist. Or what happens to Saul or the psychologist.
 
http://amzn.to/2BAInRG

Annihilation: A Novel (The Southern Reach Trilogy Book 1)

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Monday, February 19, 2018

Book Review Between the World and Me

Book Review - Between the World and Me

Between the World and Me - Amazon.com
Between the World and Me

In a profound work that pivots from the biggest questions about American history and ideals to the most intimate concerns of a father for his son, Ta-Nehisi Coates offers a powerful new framework for understanding our nation’s history and current crisis. Americans have built an empire on the idea of “race,” a falsehood that damages us all but falls most heavily on the bodies of black women and men—bodies exploited through slavery and segregation, and, today, threatened, locked up, and murdered out of all proportion. What is it like to inhabit a black body and find a way to live within it? And how can we all honestly reckon with this fraught history and free ourselves from its burden?

Between the World and Me is Ta-Nehisi Coates’s attempt to answer these questions in a letter to his adolescent son. Coates shares with his son—and readers—the story of his awakening to the truth about his place in the world through a series of revelatory experiences, from Howard University to Civil War battlefields, from the South Side of Chicago to Paris, from his childhood home to the living rooms of mothers whose children’s lives were taken as American plunder. Beautifully woven from personal narrative, reimagined history, and fresh, emotionally charged reportage, Between the World and Me clearly illuminates the past, bracingly confronts our present, and offers a transcendent vision for a way forward.

About the Author :

Ta-Nehisi Coates is an American writer, journalist, and educator. Coates is a National Correspondent for The Atlantic, where he writes about cultural, social and political issues, particularly as regards African-Americans. Coates has worked for The Village Voice, Washington City Paper, and Time. He has contributed to The New York Times Magazine, The Washington Post, The Washington Monthly, O, and other publications. In 2008 he published a memoir, The Beautiful Struggle: A Father, Two Sons, and an Unlikely Road to Manhood. His second book, Between the World and Me, was released in July 2015. It was nominated for a 2015 National Book Award for Nonfiction. He was the recipient of a "Genius Grant" from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation in 2015

It's hard to know what to say about a book about which so much has already been said. If you're familiar with Coates' writing from The Atlantic Magazine or elsewhere you already know that, in terms of style, he is a gifted writer who is always a pleasure to read, regardless of the subject matter he writes about.

The subject matter here, however, is what is most important about "Between the World and Me." Coates' uses the experience of young African Americans and his own experiences growing up to create a poetic and impassioned letter to his son and, indeed to the world, about what it means to be a person of color in the United States at the beginning of the 21st century. My personal belief is that the issue of race and institutionalized racism is the most important issue we as a country face right now. The events of the past two years have focused a bright light on issues that many of us were only dimly aware of. Or, more accurately, that we knew about but didn't want to face. For those who realize that they MUST be faced, no matter how painful we find them, Coates provides a remarkable first step with this compelling, poetic, and sometimes heartbreaking expressionistic book.

The inability to see what causes pain, even though it is right in front of us, is a very human defense mechanism. But it is a defense mechanism that does not serve any of us or our country well. Empathy and a desire to understand that which we haven't personally experienced but that we know are pernicious facts of modern Anerican life are key to the changes we must make. As an upper-middle class white woman, I've lived through very few of the events and feelings Coates describes in "Between the World and Me." Which is all the more reason for me to read it and recommend it.
I've never been shown and made to understood the experience of a life so unlike my own as I have with this book. I felt the frustration and fear that Mr. Coates felt growing up black in America. I felt the anger he feels at people who believe that they are white dismissing that experience as so many sour grapes. I felt the hypocrisy of being told not to wear hoodies or play loud music for fear of someone breaking your body.

That's why this book matters. It's not a solution to our race problems or an accurate assessment of the progress of America as a nation. It is not a book about white people and how we should change. It is simply a powerful testament of one man's experience, and an offering of understanding.

I grew up rich, white and privileged in suburban Virginia. I never had to think about my safety, my future or my pride through the lens of my race. I couldn't even begin to conceive of that experience. Ta-Nehisi Coates is the first person to break through that reality of my upbringing and allow me to step into another experience for a little while.
http://amzn.to/2BAInRG

Between the World and Me

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Book Review Black Panther: A Nation Under Our Feet Book 1

Book Review - Black Panther A Nation Under Our Feet Book 1

Black Panther - Amazon.com
Black Panther

A new era begins for the Black Panther! MacArthur Genius and National Book Award-winning writer T-Nehisi Coates (BETWEEN THE WORLD AND ME) takes the helm, confronting T'Challa with a dramatic upheaval in Wakanda that will make leading the African nation tougher than ever before. When a superhuman terrorist group that calls itself The People sparks a violent uprising, the land famed for its incredible technology and proud warrior traditions will be thrown into turmoil. If Wakanda is to survive, it must adapt--but can its monarch, one in a long line of Black Panthers, survive the necessary change? Heavy lies the head that wears the cowl!

About the Author

Ta-Nehisi Coates is an American writer, journalist, and educator. Coates is a National Correspondent for The Atlantic, where he writes about cultural, social and political issues, particularly as regards African-Americans. Coates has worked for The Village Voice, Washington City Paper, and Time. He has contributed to The New York Times Magazine, The Washington Post, The Washington Monthly, O, and other publications. In 2008 he published a memoir, The Beautiful Struggle: A Father, Two Sons, and an Unlikely Road to Manhood. His second book, Between the World and Me, was released in July 2015. It was nominated for a 2015 National Book Award for Nonfiction. He was the recipient of a "Genius Grant" from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation in 2015

Reviews :

Ta-nehisi Coates crafts a brilliant comic in his first turn as writer for Black Panther. The tale addresses tradition, power dynamics, and oppression in a way that brings life and current themes into the comic that I look forward to seeing on the silver screen. Volume 1 sets up a conflict between two nations, a system of oppression between two peoples, and the legacy of the kingdom. I look forward to reading Volume 2.
With the new Black Panther movie looking astonishingly good from its trailers, a timely Amazon sale sent some of the recent comics starring the King of Wakanda tumbling my way.
Well, I suppose from 2016, so not the most recent - but the run by Ta-Nehisi Coates has been raved about by fellow fans of T'Challa so it was about time I took a look.
I've long been a fan of Black Panther - I tend to gravitate towards heroes who aren't mighty gods or universe-menacing Phoenixes - and so the combination of genius scientist and stealthy warrior has long appealed.
 
I'll confess, though, that I'm awfully glad that I bought book two at the same time as book one. Coates takes his time to find his feet with his story - or rather, more to the point, he has a big story to tell but sometimes in volume one rushes through the actual telling, and you end up piecing a couple of the parts of the tale together in your head rather than reading it on the page. He's much more in his stride by the second volume, so if you find yourself put off a little by the opening collection, stick with it, it comes together much better as the issues go by.
 
The story itself tackles the tale of Black Panther as king, fighting to hold together his kingdom from threats within and without. He isn't all-seeing or all-wise, rather he's a man underneath the legend, making political choices that might not always be for the best, but are mostly made with the best intentions.
 
The tale tackles issues of nationalism, identity, monarchism and democracy - weighty matters that go beyond the usual super villain hokum of many comics. Sometimes, that strays into territory of info dumping, but as I say, the method of telling the story keeps improving.
 
I'm not terribly sure it will serve as a great introduction to readers for the Black Panther movie - but it's a powerful look at the world the comics character inhabits - with a wider landscape than his stories are often afforded.
 
http://amzn.to/2BAInRG

Black Panther

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