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Showing posts with label Military & War. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Military & War. Show all posts

Tuesday, February 27, 2018

TV-Series Review NCIS Seasons 15

TV-Series Review - NCIS 15 Seasons

NCIS Season 15 Episodes - CBS.com
NCIS Season 15 Episodes

The 15th season of NCIS returns two months after Special Agents Gibbs (Mark Harmon) and McGee (Sean Murray) were last seen fighting a group of rebels in Paraguay. Last season's dangerous mission will forever change each member of the team and bring this family of agents closer than ever. 
1. House Divided
2. Twofer
3. Exit Strategy
4. Skeleton Crew
5. Fake It 'Til You Make It
6. Trapped
7. Burden of Proof
8. Voices
9. Ready or Not
10. Double Down
11. High Tide
12. Dark Secrets
13. Family Ties
14. Keep Your Friends Close
15. New Team Friendships and Rivalries

I've been a fan of mark harmon for a long time. When NCIS came online and I saw the cast I had to watch it. i've watched all the seasons plus shopped at the gift shop on line. NCIS is everywhere at my house. I see people come and go the imprint that each person leaves is and imprint on the person watching this show. I'm 61 for me it brings a little life back in me. The show means a lot to a lot of people. Mark (Gibbs) lives by a code in the show. and i think everyone needs a little bit of code to live by. i will be sorry to see the show come to and end .The cast has been at this a long time. But you do touch people.
NCIS had a rocky season last year--no wonder, with the departure of Michael Weatherley after 13 years and the sudden death of long-time show runner Gary Glasberg. Story threads got lost, writing was uneven, and, sadly, the "team" just never jelled. There was a lot of adolescent silliness in the office. But from the first show of Season 15 on, the show is totally back on track and better than ever: good stories well written and acted, newer characters fitting in well now, and the team members have suddenly all grown up again. (Gibbs never needed too, but he has also changed in interesting new ways). There is still enjoyable good humor among them, but a lot less silliness. New addition Agent Jack Sloane is a strong plus.
NCIS has been characterized by strong characters, good plots, and good directing. This IMHO is not the real source of its popularity. NCIS has been so popular because its characters are patriotic and care about honor and integrity. They are front line soldiers working for something greater than themselves. Last season was not a great one, due to a weak character, who has now left the show. There's only been one episode of the new season, but it was excellent. If the writers are going to expand McGee and Bishop's roles, that will be great. The writers definitely haven't lost their touch. If you liked it before, you'll still like it. Unless the rest of the episodes just collapse (unlikely) I anticipate a very enjoyable season. 
NCIS is still the best of all the NCIS’s.
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NCIS Seasons 15

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TV-Series Review
NCIS Seasons 15

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Movie Review Wonder Woman

Movie Review - Wonder Woman

Wonder Woman - Amazon.com
Wonder Woman

Before she was Wonder Woman, she was Diana, princess of the Amazons. Fighting alongside man in a war to end all wars, Diana will discover her full powers and her true destiny.


The storyline in a nutshell: Diana leaves her paradise Island of Themiscyra that is magically hidden from the rest of the world to fight alongside men in a war to end all wars.

Wonder Woman is a movie that everyone can comprehend and accept, which is not brooding and polarizing like other DC movies. Unlike many comic book movies that make the main character one dimensional, I have never seen so many profound aspects in a fictitious superhero movie before. It is a movie beyond woman equality, history, war, ethics and even religion. It’s about honor, duty, good, evil, love and doing what is right.

Wonder Woman is a good mix of action helped by the back drop of The Great War/World War I. It is not just plain adventure but has a narrative focused on the increasingly treacherous world with diminishing tolerance and morality. While I don't consider it good to compare, it was inevitable to see similarities with Captain America: The First Avenger.
This doesn’t just create a good visual. After a three-movie streak of stinkers from DC studios, this moment demonstrates what makes superheroes, something Zack Snyder apparently doesn’t appreciate. Heroes represent, not the recourses we’re willing to live with, as with Snyder's Superman, but the aspirations we pursue, the better angels we hope to achieve. We all hope, faced with the nihilism of the Great War, that we’d overcome bureaucratic inertia and face our enemies head-on.

In some ways, this Wonder Woman, directed by relative novice Patty Jenkins, accords with DC’s recent cinematic outings. Diana’s heroism doesn’t stoop to fighting crime, a reflection of cultural changes since the character debuted in 1941. Ordinary criminals, even organized crime, seem remarkably small beer in today’s world. Crime today is often either penny-ante, like common burglars, or too diffuse to punch, like drug cartels. Like the Snyder-helmed movies, this superhero confronts more systemic problems.

But Snyder misses the point, which Jenkins hits. Where Snyder’s superheroes battle alien invaders, like Superman, or pummel the living daylights out of each other, Wonder Woman faces humanity’s greatest weaknesses. The Great War, one of humanity’s lowest moments, represents a break from war’s previous myths of honor. Rather than marching into battle gloriously, Great War soldiers hunkered in trenches for months, soaked and gangrenous, seldom bathing, eating tinned rations out of their own helmets.

This shift manifests in two ways. First, though Diana speaks eloquently about her desire to stop Ares, the war-god she believes is masquerading as a German general, this story is driven by something more down-to-earth. General Ludendorff’s research battalion has created an unusually powerful form of mustard gas. The very real-world Ludendorff, who popularized the expression “Total War,” here successfully crafts a means to destroy soldiers and civilians alike. He represents humanity’s worst warlike sentiments.

Second, this Wonder Woman doesn’t wear a stars-and-stripes uniform. Comic book writer William Moulton Marston created Wonder Woman as an essentially female version of Superman’s American values, an expression externalized in her clothing. This theme carried over into Lynda Carter’s TV performance. But this Wonder Woman stays strictly in Europe, fights for high-minded Allied values rather than one country, and apparently retires to curatorship at the Louvre. Her values are unyoked to any specific nation.

Recall, Zack Snyder’s Superman learned from his human father to distrust humankind, and became superheroic only when threatened by Kryptonian war criminals. Diana, conversely, learned to fight for high-minded principles—which she learned through myths which, she eventually discovers, are true without being factual. Snyder’s Superman, in fighting General Zod, showed remarkable disregard for bystanders, his film’s most-repeated criticism. But Diana charges into battle specifically to liberate occupied civilians. The pointed contrast probably isn’t accidental.

Unfortunately, Diana learns, war isn’t about individual battles. She liberates a shell-pocked Belgian village, and celebrates by dancing with Steve Trevor in the streets. But General Ludendorff retaliates by testing his extra-powerful chemical weapons on that village. No matter what piteous stories she hears about displaced, starving individuals, ultimately, her enemy isn’t any particular soldier. It’s a system that rewards anyone willing to stoop lower than everyone else, kill more noncombatants, win at any cost.

In a tradition somewhat established by the superhero genre, Diana culminates the movie with a half-fight, half-conversation with her antagonist. Ares offers Diana the opportunity to restore Earth’s pre-lapsarian paradise state by simply scourging the planet of humanity. (Though Greek in language, this movie’s mythology reflects its audience’s Judeo-Christian moral expectations.) Diana responds by… well, spoilers. Rather, let’s say she simply resolves that fighting the corrupt system is finally worthwhile, even knowing she cannot win.

Wonder Woman’s moral mythology resonates with audiences, as Superman’s doesn’t, at least in the Snyderverse, because she expresses hope. Watching Diana, we realize it’s easy to become Ludendorff, wanting to not just beat but obliterate our opponents. Yet we desire to emulate Diana, standing fast against human entropy and embodying our best virtues. Diana is a demigod, we eventually learn, and like all good messiahs, she doesn’t just rule humanity, she models humanity’s truest potential.


This is by far the best DC to be made since The Dark Knight. Although I remain loyal to Marvel, I am pleased with DC success with Wonder Woman as it is one of the most well rounded, entertaining superhero movies to date.
 
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Wonder Woman

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Saturday, February 17, 2018

Movie Review 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi

Movie Review 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi

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13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi

From director Michael Bay, 13 HOURS is the gripping true story of six elite ex-military operators assigned to protect the CIA who fought back against overwhelming odds when terrorists attacked a U.S. diplomatic compound on September 11, 2012.
Starring: James Badge Dale, John Krasinski, Max Martini
Runtime: 2 hours, 24 minutes 
 
13 Hours does a phenomenal job of recounting the September 11, 2012 attack on the U.S. compounds in Benghazi, Libya. Regardless of the politics surrounding the Benghazi attacks, the film does an excellent job of examining the events that led up to the attack, as well as showcasing the heroism of the men that fought to defend American citizens. It gives a moving glimpse into the experiences of U.S. military personnel and the realities of combat.

I was worried that the film would be diluted by political commentary, but it isn't. The politics surrounding the event are touched on briefly, but are by no means a prominent theme in the film. It keeps the focus on the men that fought bravely to defend the U.S. compounds and save lives. Wonderful film.
 
Fantastic movie. I can stream this free thanks to Prime, but I'm picking up the blu-ray cause I like voting with my wallet. And this movie deserves all the positive votes it can receive.

Many would classify me as a hardcore conservative. Maybe I am. I believe in the Bible front-to-back, God first, family second, country third. I support our troops. Doesn't mean I condone every military action our nation is involved in, but the men and women on the front line- I support them. I want them all to accomplish their mission and then return home safe and sound.

This is a movie about those men. It shows their sacrifice, their courage, even their weakness (soldiers get scared too).

Love this movie. I don't consider it biased in anyway. Be that pro-conservative, anti-us-military, etc. It's a movie that focuses on the soldiers, tells their story. That's it. No political BS thrown in.

So freaking awesome. Watch this movie. It is amazing.
 
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13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi

Genres Military & War, Drama, Thriller, Action
Director Michael Bay
Starring John Krasinski, James Badge Dale
Supporting actors Pablo Schreiber, David Denman, Dominic Fumusa, Max Martini, Alexia Barlier, David Costabile, Payman Maadi, Matt Letscher, Toby Stephens, Demetrius Grosse, David Giuntoli, Kevin Kent, David Furr, Mike Moriarty, Freddie Stroma, Kenny Sheard, Andrew Arrabito, Christopher Dingli
Studio Paramount Pictures
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
http://amzn.to/2BwHn17

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